Gentle Currents and the counseling process is really summed up for me in one word: Transformation. Think approaching people with authenticity and genuineness, giving them the space to explore the issues they’re facing inside without jumping to quick answers, solutions, or advice.

I like to tailor my approach towards the individual person. Whether it’s cognitive behavioral therapy, emotionally focused therapy, process-oriented therapy, sensory and motor therapy, or OEI, there’s no end to modalities, and I like to be flexible and adapt to the person that I’m working with. I like to take the one that makes the most sense to the person I meet rather than have a one-size-fits-all.

The most common issues that we address in counseling are things like anxiety and depression, relationship and couples’ issues, like mother and son or father and daughter, and PTSD, which is very common.

Neurofeedback is a great way to help people who have suffered from a brain injury, children who are autistic, or people who suffer from PTSD or anxiety and depression. It has a proven track record in research for being helpful for folks.

Research has shown that most of the change that occurs from any form of counseling is a direct result of the value and quality of the therapeutic relationship. That relationship is more important than any intervention that’s used, and the ability to develop a working relationship with another person and explore what the issues are, from one individual to another.

Creating that therapeutic relationship is like creating a cocoon, from which they can form themselves and understand themselves from the inside. When they’re ready to experience that transformation at their own pace, they are ready to make their way out of that cocoon and grow to become the more authentic and genuine version of themselves they were meant to be.

Michael Dadson completed my PhD in Counseling Psychology at the University of British Columbia, my Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology in Trinity-Western University, and I have my Master’s in Divinity from Calvin Theological Seminary.

If you have any questions or think you might need counseling help, get in touch.

I’ll always be here for you,

Dr. Michael Dadson, PhD Counselling Psychology, out of my clinic in Langley, BC.

Gentle Currents and the counseling process is really summed up for me in one word: Transformation. Think approaching people with authenticity and genuineness, giving them the space to explore the issues they’re facing inside without jumping to quick answers, solutions, or advice.

I like to tailor my approach towards the individual person. Whether it’s cognitive behavioral therapy, emotionally focused therapy, process-oriented therapy, sensory and motor therapy, or OEI, there’s no end to modalities, and I like to be flexible and adapt to the person that I’m working with. I like to take the one that makes the most sense to the person I meet rather than have a one-size-fits-all.

The most common issues that we address in counseling are things like anxiety and depression, relationship and couples’ issues, like mother and son or father and daughter, and PTSD, which is very common.

Neurofeedback is a great way to help people who have suffered from a brain injury, children who are autistic, or people who suffer from PTSD or anxiety and depression. It has a proven track record in research for being helpful for folks.

Research has shown that most of the change that occurs from any form of counseling is a direct result of the value and quality of the therapeutic relationship. That relationship is more important than any intervention that’s used, and the ability to develop a working relationship with another person and explore what the issues are, from one individual to another.

Creating that therapeutic relationship is like creating a cocoon, from which they can form themselves and understand themselves from the inside. When they’re ready to experience that transformation at their own pace, they are ready to make their way out of that cocoon and grow to become the more authentic and genuine version of themselves they were meant to be.

Michael Dadson completed my PhD in Counseling Psychology at the University of British Columbia, my Master’s degree in Counseling Psychology in Trinity-Western University, and I have my Master’s in Divinity from Calvin Theological Seminary.

If you have any questions or think you might need counseling help, get in touch.

I’ll always be here for you,

Dr. Michael Dadson, PhD Counselling Psychology, out of my clinic in Langley, BC.